The perfect home made Cornetto

Cornetto, the iconic Italian brioche that we eat for breakfast, softer and less crispy of a French croissant, it is served warm in the Italian bars to free the citrusy aromas of the zest and the sweetness of the vanilla, while the buttery texture melts in your mouth.

I have already written about Cornetti, the iconic Italian breakfast and how, unfortunately, most of the cornetti that you taste in the Italian bars are deep frozen, that is not a bad thing in itself, but according to this overview https://www.dionidream.com/report-ecco-quanto-fanno-male-i-cornetti-del-bar/this lovey breakfast has at least %80 of its fats from palm oil, a lot of glucose and fructose. Not very healthy!

It is absolutely worthy to prepare the at home. Double or triple your dose, deep freeze them at the end of phase 6  and you will have a delicious Italian breakfast ready for nearly a month!

For an easier recipe click here

Ingredients:

For the pastry

500 gr of flour

50 gr of sugar

50 gr of butter

pinch of salt

250 gr of water

1 teaspoon of mixed zest of lemon and orange

some drops of vanilla extract

50 gr of milk at room temperature

12 gr. dried yeast

To laminate the dough

250 gr of soft butter

For the glaze

1  beaten egg mixed with 2 tablespoons of milk

a little raw cane sugar for dusting on top

Instruction

1. Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and stand for 5 minutes. Put the flour in the bowl of a standing mixer make an hole  pour in the yeasted water, the milk and the sugar and let it rise for about 15 minutes, the mix  with the hook on low speed for 1 minutes, add the softened butter, the orange zest, the vanilla and mix well mix at low speed for about 20 minutes, the dough should be very elastic.

2. Place the dough into an oiled bowl, cover with streach film and rest for half an hour in a warm place. 

3. Meanwhile take the butter for the lamination, put it between two sheet of baking paper , stretch it into a rectangle of 25 X 20 cm and 3mm hight. Place it back in the refrigerator.

4. Roll the dough onto a floured surface to shape a rectangle about 50×22 and 3 mm thick. Place the square of butter in the  the rolled out dough so that it covere 2/3 of the dough, then fold into three like a business letter and roll gently, cover with strech film and rest in the fridge for 30 minutes. After that roll the dough into a rectangle then fold into three again, cover with strech film and rest in the fridge for 30 minutes. Repeat two more time.

5. After the dough has rested for the fourth time, roll it again in a 55X22 cm rectangle 3 mm thick. Cut the rectangle in triangles. Roll each triangle onto itself starting from the base and gently stretching the dough. Once they are rolled gently curve them to form a  crescent 

6. Lay them onto a tray lined with baking paper cover the tray with stretch film and let them rise in a warm place until at least doubled 

7. Preheat the oven to 200 C. glaze the cornetti, dust the with sugar and bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.

Note:

With the prepared dough you can prepare AMAZING cinnamon rolls, just follow the passages here

Advertisements

Bath Buns for a gamekeeper

Hagrid poured them tea and offered them a plate of Bath buns but they knew better than to accept; they had had too much experience with Hagrid’s cooking. (Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban, ch.14)

Hagrid, the half giant gamekeeper of Hogwarts, does not enjoy a reputation of a good cook but his treacle fudge is going to be very handy for Harry Potter in this same novel.   

But what about those buns? They are named after the town of Bath in the southwest of England and it is one of the places beloved by Jane Austen that placed many central episodes of her novels there (think about Persuasion or Northanger Abbey).

There is a large debate on the origins of those buns, they are either attributed to Sally Lunn a French Huguenot refugees during the period that bring the recipe with her, or to the physician William Oliver. I had a look to my personal bible, when we are speaking about English food, that is Lady Carlotte Campbell Bury, The Lady’s Own Cookery Book, were there are two different versions for the buns, one, it doesn’t resemble to a bun at all, rather a biscuit. The second one is the one that I present here, a bit adapted to modern taste.

edf

Ingredients

For the dough:

250 g. milk

10g. dried yeast

650g. white flour

3 tbs of sugar

½ teaspoon of salt

280 gr. butter

50 gr. sultanas or cranberry

For the finishing:

4 tbs sugar

2tbs water

3 tbs of sugar pearls

Directions

Warm the milk with the butter, until the butter is completely melted.

Combine the flour, sugar and salt in a bowl. Add the milk and butter, then bring together into a dough. Knead until is elastic.

Put the dough in a warm place for 2 hours or until doubled in size.

Turn the dough out on to a floured surface add the sultana or the cranberries and work them in. 

Take small pieces of the dough a prepare the round buns.

Allow the buns to rise in a warm place until doubled in size.

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Cook in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown

Make a syrup by mixing the sugar and the water in a pot and bring it to boil. Brush the syrup over the buns as soon as they came out of the oven. Sprinkle sugar pearls on the top.

Serve with jam and whipped cream.

Finally, I don’t know if I am a good cook but, Hagrid, sorry, I am better than you!

edf
edf

Raviole alla crema di cioccolato e mascarpone

Raviole al cioccolato e mascarpone che si sciolgono in bocca, ispirate alla ricetta delle sorelle Simili nel libro “Pane e roba dolce”.  Una piccola consolazione nelle giornate di pioggia

(In English here)

edf

Cresciute in mezzo al profumo del pane, Margherita e Valeria Simili hanno ereditato dalla famiglia non solo la panetteria, ma anche la passione per la cucina casalinga tradizionale. Dopo aver gestito per anni con successo la loro scuola di cucina, adesso si dedicano a tenere corsi in altre scuole o in televisione. copertina similiIl loro “Pane e roba dolce un classico della tradizione italiana” è un libro meraviglioso perché propone ricette assolutamente sicure, basta seguire passo per passo le istruzioni delle due sorelle, ma anche ci introduce ai segreti di chi ha gestito per anni un negozio di panetteria: come modificare leggermente un impasto per farlo diventare qualcosa di diverso.

Quella che propongo oggi è la loro ricetta del ciambellone emiliano, più simile, per consistenza alla pastafrolla che al ciambellone della nonna a cui siamo abituati. Ci spiegano anche che con lo stesso impasto si possono fare diversi prodotti: la pinza, i biscotti e le raviole.

A partire dalla ricetta delle sorelle Simili ho creato delle raviole ripiene di crema di cioccolata e mascarpone. Il mascarpone mi è servito a mantenere morbida la crema di cioccolato che altrimenti nella cottura in forno diventerebbe secca e granulosa. Rispetto alla ricetta delle sorelle Simili ho dimezzato le dosi ed ho leggermente aumentato il burro perché per me è difficile trovare lo strutto.

edf

Per l’impasto

½  kg di farina

200 g di burro a temperatura ambiente

160 g di zucchero

25 g di latte

5 g di miele non amaro

½ cucchiaino di sale

1 bustina di lievito chimico

2 uova

Per il ripieno:

Crema di cioccolata

50 g di mascarpone

Burro fuso per spennellare

 

edf

Mettere tutti gli ingredienti eccetto il lievito nella planetaria ed impastare a velocità bassa con il gancio a foglia. Una volta pronto l’impasto, aggiungere il lievito ed impastare fino ad assorbimento completo.

Se non si possiede una planetaria, mettere la farina a fontana sulla spianatoia e nel centro della fontana mettere tutti gli ingredienti eccetto il lievito. Impastare utilizzando una spatola e non le mani, una volta che la farina avrà completamente assorbito tutti gli ingredienti, aggiungete il lievito e continuate a mescolare fino a completo assorbimento.

Stendete l’impasto ottenuto con un mattarello fino a quando sia alto circa 3 mm.

Con uno stampo rotondo ritagliate dei cerchi che spalmerete con crema di cioccolato facendo attenzione a lasciare libero circa ½ cm dal bordo.

Al centro della crema di cioccolata mettete un cucchiaino di mascarpone.

Piegate il cerchio in modo da formare un raviolo.

Spennellate con del burro fuso e cuocete in forno statico a 180 gradi per circa mezz’ora.

Servite a temperatura ambiente, spolverate di zucchero a velo.

Non mangiatele tutte in un giorno!

edf

edf

Rolls and Buns for Pippi

What can you do when you have a child at home that is still recovering and can’t go out? Readingof course is the best of pastimes but what if your child is a really Pippi Longstockingand she can stay still for a second? In honor of this delightful character created by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren, we decided to run a home version of “MasterChef” inspired to the Swedish pastry masterpiece  THE CINNAMON ROLLS. The rule was that we both used the same dough but we had free hands on the filling and the way we rolled them.pippi

My choice was classic I went for cardamom rolls, with a filling of grounded almonds and cardamom that recall the oriental texture and smell of the Persian baghlava, my daughter decided for a filling of apple  sautéed in a little butter and sugar, finally seasoned with abundant cinnamon. We also decided to roll them in a different way, I rolled each of them individually; my daughter preferred the traditional way, rolling one big roll and then cut it in slices.

AND THE WINNER IS… But first thing first (as Gordon Ramsey says): the recipes

img_0678.jpg

For the dough

Ingredients:

100 gr of butter

1 and ¼ cup of mild

2 tbs of dry yest

½ ts of salt

½ cup of sugar

1 egg

1 ts of baking powder

4 cups flour

IMG_0659

Directions:

Melt the butter and add the milk. Heat to 37 C and melt the yeast in it. Let it rise for about 10 minutes

In the stand mixer bowl combine the yeastmixture, salt, sugar, and egg, mix it well

Add baking powder and flourand knead until the dough is smooth and smooth and elastic (15 minutes, medium speed if you use the stand mixer)

Let it rise for at least one hour

 

Cardamom buns

IMG_0684

Ingredients:

1 cup of almond paste

50 gr of butter

1 full tbs of ground cardamom

 

directions:

Divided the dough into 12 piecesof equal size and form with each a circle

Prepare amixture of cardamom, almond paste and butter

Spread themixture on each circle and then roll it up, then roll it like a snail

Put eachroll in a paper baking cup

Let it rise for about anhour then brush with beaten egg

Bake it at 180 C for about 25 minutes

 

Apple buns

IMG_0670

Ingredients:

1 apple apple diced

 

3 tbs of sugar

1 tbs of cinnamon

1 tbs of butter

Sautee the diced apple with butter and sugar for about 5 minutes at small heat, then take it from the heat, add cinnamon, mix well and let it cool

Roll the dough into a large rectangle and spread the apple filling, roll up and cut into even slices.

Place them in parchment-lined baking sheet and let them rise for another hour

Brush with beaten egg and bake in the oven 180 C for about 200 minutes

Prepare a sauce mixing icing sugar with some drop of lemon and drop tiny bits of the sauce on the rolls.

The winner : apple buns

IMG_0682

And the loser: Cardamom rolls

IMG_0683

 

The Bar Lume’s Cornetti

I cornetti del Bar Lume in italiano 

Bar Lume is an Italian bar in a small sea resort near Pisa (when I read the novels it sounds like Vecchiano), four old geezers and Massimo the Barman, spend their time chatting, arguing, and theorizing about murders in town. The four old men analyze crimes and suspects and Massimo analyzes them with sarcastic wit. The 51GAmwpI5aL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_author, Malvaldi, uses a colorful proseto describe a way of living that resists despite the hordes of tourists tha came in the summersin the small beach town. Every morning Massimo put in the oven frozen Italian Cornetti, that are not at all like the French croissant, their have a richer smell (due to the presence of of orange and lemon zests and vanilla) a more sugary flavor and a fluffier texture. In my family we all love Cornetti but after I read an article about the harm of theingredients used  in professional pastry, I have tried to prepare them myself. The original recipe is quite complex, I will give it later. But this one is easy to prepare, if you double the doses, you can freezea batch of them and have your fresh Cornetto every morning.IMG_0516.JPG

 

Ingredients:

550 gr strong flour (like Manitoba)

180 gr milk

70 g water

70 gr sugar (+ more for the layers)

10 gr of dry yeast

2 eggs

1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

1 orange grated peel

1 lemon grated peel

70 gr of butter (+ about 100 gr of room temperature butter for the layers)

A pinch of salt

1 egg for the glaze

 IMG_0538.JPG

Directions

The sponge:

  1. Sprinkle yeast and sugar into 100 gr of warm milkin the bowl of a stand mixer and stir to dissolve
  2. Set it  to rise in a warm place for about one hour.

 

The dough:

  1. Mix the flour with saltand add it to the sponge, pour in the batter the remaining milk and the water.
  2. Attach the dough hook to the mixer and knead it until you have a smooth and elastic dough (about 10 minutes at medium speed) then add all the remaining ingredients and knead it for another 10-15 minutes.
  3. Work it a bit on a floured surface, cover with plastic wrap and let it rise another hour (but it depends on room temperature, less if it is a hot summer day).
  4. Knock back and divide the dough in eight small ball. Let it rise for another hour.
  5. Knock back the first ball and roll with a pin until 2-3 mm high, spread the with butter uniformly, sprinkle with sugar and cover with another rolled dough When you have 8 layer, cut the dough in 16 triangles and roll it Let it rise for another half an hour.
  6. Make an egg glaze by lightly beating the egg
  7. Brush the top of the loaf with the glaze. Bake it in a preheated oven at 200°C for about 20 minutes until golden and hollow-sounding when tapped underneath. If you have a steam oven like me, then start with the low humidy program for about 10 minutes and then turn to the convection bake for the rest of the time.

 

IMG_0539.JPG

Blueberry jam pie/The Jane Austen Challenge

 

‘Then the baked apples came home, Mrs Wallis sent them by her boy; they are always extremely civil and obliging to us, the Wallises, always —I have heard some people say that Mrs Wallis can be uncivil and give a very rude answer, but we have never known anything but the greatest attention from them. And it cannot be for the value of our custom, now, for what is our consumption of bread, you know? Only three of us [endearingly, she counts Patty] —besides dear Jane at present —and she really eats nothing —makes such a shocking breakfast, you would be quite frightened if you saw it. I dare not let my mother know how little she eats – so 1 say one thing and then I say another, and it passes off. But about the middle of the day she gets hungry, and there is nothing she likes so well as these baked apples, and they are extremely wholesome, for I took the opportunity the other day of asking Mr Perry; I happened to meet him in the street. Not that I had any doubt before – I have so often heard Mr Woodhouse recommend a baked apple. I believe it is the only way that Mr Woodhouse thinks the fruit thoroughly wholesome. We have apple dumplings, however, very often. Patty makes an excellent apple dumpling.’ (Emma).

IMG_0510.JPG

I haven’t written in my Jane Austen Challenge for a while because I was distracted by all this amazing spring herbs and fruits that are so abundant in the Mediterranean area but not very common on a Regency table.

Sweet pies (in particular apple pies) are often mentioned in Jane Austen’s novels and letters: in Austin’s time not all the household were so lucky to have a oven of their own, so, in this case, the Bates has to send the pies out to the baker to have them cook.

Back to our modern time I decided to use what was left of my homemade blueberry jam that I prepared last  summer for this pie, I used spelt flour instead of white flour, because it adds an extra crunchy texture to the crust and it tastes a little bit like almonds.

The aspect of this recipe that I really like is that you don’t need a scale, a simple cup will do the job. I used a biscuit injector machine to ornate my pie with romantic flower-like biscuit. The recipe was enough for a pie of 25 cm. of diameter and 20 small biscuits.

IMG_0497.JPG

Ingredients:

2 cups of spelt flour (or white flour)

½ cup of sugar

½ of butter (cold)

2 Tbs of yogurt

1 egg

5 gr raising powder

Blueberry jam (also raspberry jam is nice with spelt flour)

Directions:

  • In a large bowl, mix  flour, sugar and baking powder, then add the butter, yogurt and egg.
  • Mix all the ingredient, but pay attention to work the mixture for just the minimum time required to form a soft dough, you haven’t to warm the butter!
  • Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll out on a floured surface until is abut ½ cm thick.
  • Transfer the rolled crust to an ungreased pie plate. Trim the dish of any extra dough.
  • Fill the pastry shell with the jam, then with the extra dough prepare some decorations. Bake in pre heated oven at 180° for 30-35 minutes, until golden.

IMG_0514.JPG